The Skilled Craftsman

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Lancaster county has countless skilled craftsmen that still take pride in their work. From woodworkers who build custom furniture, to master leather craftsmen who supply the local community with leather goods, to those who work with various metal products,a rich heritage of doing things by hand still exists today. I recently was in search of a piece of copper for a project and a friend directed me to a small shop he knew of out in the countryside. I pulled in the driveway of the address I was given and the small building in front of me gave no hint of what I was about to see. As I walked in the dark unlit interior, I was immediately drawn to a beautiful copper train that was being built one piece at a time for a customer. The level of detail was amazing and spoke to the skill of the metalsmith who was building it. After a brief conversation, I decided to ask if he would consider allowing me to come back one evening and photograph it? The answer was sure,but he told me the train was being picked up that night and an immediate feeling of missing a chance to record something special came over me. He did tell me he was making another two trains for this customer and maybe in the future,I could try a shot? We got each others phone numbers and I headed off thinking about the missed opportunity, but to my amazement, the phone rang that evening and he told me it would be here for another day, and if I wanted to come back,he would be there all evening.  I immediately said yes and gathered my gear to head over. All the way there, I worried I was not going to come up with a way to capture the train because it is actually a weathervane and has a tube and support attached and it does not just sit on a table. The owner was very patient with me and was more than happy to move things around to get the right setup for the shot. My final composition shown above included the recently finished copper train, with the very first copper train that has been treated with a patina to give it an aged look in the background. I wish I could recognize the man who built this train, but in the interest of privacy ,all you need to know is that he is just one of Lancaster counties many skilled craftsmen.There is no electricity here or fancy tools, just talent and hard work and I was certainly impressed.

Cool Bonnets

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As much as I photograph the Amish where I live, I must admit I know relatively little about much of their lives and the things I see. Take for instance the two adults and two children shown here, who were out in their buggy on a weekday wearing these rather unique bonnets. It was slightly cool this morning so maybe they are merely warmer than the regular covering I often see them wearing but then again I may be way off. Either way I liked the cool wagon and the attire so I snapped a quick shot with a long lens.

Compress It

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This pair of Amish farms appear to be on the same property, when in reality they are separated by maybe a quarter-mile and there is actually a road that runs between them. Using a long lens of 300-400mm helps compress the distance.What caused me to stop in the first place was the late evening blue light on the metal roof as the sun was quickly dropping toward the horizon and putting things in shade.