Hunsecker’s Mill Covered Bridge

This is the Hunsecker’s Mill covered bridge in Lancaster county and it is the longest single span bridge in the county at 180 feet. It has always been painted in some drab shade of gray or brown as long as I can remember and because of that I never really got too excited about it. Most of our local bridges are red, one is white and then this. Here are a few facts, it was built in 1843 at the astronomical cost of $1,988 dollars, and got washed away and destroyed in 1972 by hurricane Agnes. In 1973 it was rebuilt at a cost of $321,302 dollars which is like 166 times more. It is quite common to hear car horns beep as they go through and I have heard it is for good luck or to let oncoming cars know you are in there. The fence was not always here but I like the addition of it as it leads the eye right into the bridge.

6 responses to “Hunsecker’s Mill Covered Bridge

  1. Am I remembering another picture of this because the fence makes me think so?
    It’s beautiful even though very drab. Glad they rebuilt it as a covered bridge because today it would probably be built with concrete. I take good craftsmanship for granted around here and don’t really notice it.
    Thanks for sharing!

    • it is quite possible. I lose track to be honest. It is amazing to see the things they did way back without all the fancy tools we have today. If you want to have your mind blown look at thewarthermuseum.com this man carved things that are almost impossible to comprehend, including his famous Pliers Tree which was displayed at the 1933–34 Century of Progress World’s Fair in Chicago, and Warther personally demonstrated to Robert Ripley that he could close every pair of pliers, folding the ornate tree back into the shape of that original block of walnut. the tree has 511 interconnected pliers that were carved from a single block of wood! it almost seems like he was guided from above.

      • Thanks, I found pictures of the pliers tree. Impressive indeed! Folks also took pride in and appreciated fine craftsmanship, unlike today.

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